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Coaching tips

How to encourage movement off the ball

Here are some suggestions to generate more player movement, off the ball. Play 4v0 in a grid. As the football is passed, all players but the receiver must move to ...

Soccer coaching’s cardinal sins

This list has made me reflect on my coaching style and try to be a better coach the next time I step onto the coaching field. Hopefully, it will do ...

The ideal youth soccer coach

Everyone involved in soccer coaching needs to understand what children want from their 'ideal' soccer coach. Most importantly, it is important to treat children with respect and not as if ...

Basic coaching concepts for players up to the age of seven

Individual Technical and Tactical Issues for U-5’s and U-6’s by Tom Turner, Ohio Youth Soccer Association-North, Director of Coaching and Player Development Coordination and Basic Motor Skills Very young children ...

First season as a youth soccer coach

For the parent coach that's new to the game and coaching, the first two questions they usually ask are "What am I supposed to do and how will I do ...

A one page guide to youth soccer coaching

Perhaps the most important 'key' to successful youth soccer coaching is this: Always aim to make the training sessions fun for everyone - including you! But...you can only do this ...

Coaching the swarm

Most teams (and new coaches) are thrown into games after just a few practices - well before the coach has had any real chance to teach the players anything. Thus, ...

Youth soccer coaching best practice

A report by the U.S. Soccer’s Coaching Education Department This report is both a practical guide and a thought-provoking discussion about how best to coach football (soccer) to young children ...
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Coaching tips and advice

Coachig tips and advice

Coachig tips and advice

How to encourage movement off the ball

Here are some suggestions to generate more player movement, off the ball. Play 4v0 in a grid. As the football is passed, all players but the receiver must move to ...

Soccer coaching’s cardinal sins

This list has made me reflect on my coaching style and try to be a better coach the next time I step onto the coaching field. Hopefully, it will do ...

The ideal youth soccer coach

Everyone involved in soccer coaching needs to understand what children want from their 'ideal' soccer coach. Most importantly, it is important to treat children with respect and not as if ...

Basic coaching concepts for players up to the age of seven

Individual Technical and Tactical Issues for U-5’s and U-6’s by Tom Turner, Ohio Youth Soccer Association-North, Director of Coaching and Player Development Coordination and Basic Motor Skills Very young children ...

First season as a youth soccer coach

For the parent coach that's new to the game and coaching, the first two questions they usually ask are "What am I supposed to do and how will I do ...

A one page guide to youth soccer coaching

Perhaps the most important 'key' to successful youth soccer coaching is this: Always aim to make the training sessions fun for everyone - including you! But...you can only do this ...

Coaching the swarm

Most teams (and new coaches) are thrown into games after just a few practices - well before the coach has had any real chance to teach the players anything. Thus, ...

Youth soccer coaching best practice

A report by the U.S. Soccer’s Coaching Education Department This report is both a practical guide and a thought-provoking discussion about how best to coach football (soccer) to young children ...
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On your bike!

This drill was  adapted from a game in The Ultimate Football Warm-Ups Manual.

Objective: To practice passing and receiving skills.

Set-up: Put your players into pairs. One ball per pair.

Place three flat cones in a short line.

How to play:

One player is a server and his partner works round the cones.

The player working must go forward to receive a pass then back-pedal up and around the cones in order to receive another pass on the opposite side.

The players work for 30 seconds on the following:

1. First-time pass back with left foot.

2. First-time pass back with right foot.

3. Bouncing serve and a half-volley return with left foot.

4. Bouncing serve and a half-volley return with right foot.

5. Aerial serve and a volley return with left foot.

6. Aerial serve and a volley return with right foot.

7. Aerial serve and head the ball back.

When the sequence is complete, swap the players round.

Coaching notes: Players should work at speed but accuracy is also important.

  • Make the game competitive by seeing which pair can get through the entire sequence without making a mistake.

For more soccer coaching tips and products visit Soccer Coaching Club.

Walking the dog

Walking the Dog is a great way to introduce ball control and dribbling to very young football players.

It also encourages the development of spatial awareness and soccer vision.

Even children as young as two or three will learn how to keep the ball close to them while running and I’ve used this game with children as “old” as 10!

Set up: Scatter lots of flat cones in two different colours in a large playing area. In this example, I’ve used green and white cones.

Every player has a ball.

How to play: Tell your players their ball is a dog.

Now ask them to give their dog a name. Have some fun with this! Who can think of the silliest name for a dog?

Now it’s time to take the “dogs” for a walk.

Tell your players the white cones are lamp posts and the green cones are trees.

To begin with, the dogs want to sniff every lamp post. This means players have to run with the ball and pause beside every white cone.

Then: “It’s raining! Get your dog under the ‘trees’!”

Now the players run with their ball to the green cones.

Variations:

  • Dribble with both feet (or just their weaker foot).
  • Who can get under a tree the quickest? You don’t want to get wet!
  • Who can let their dogs sniff the most lamp posts in 20 seconds?

For more soccer coaching tips and products visit Soccer Coaching Club.